Machine Park

  • Lama SA 315 B

    1. Before
    2. After
    Technical Data

    The Aérospatiale SA-315 Lama is a light multipurpose helicopter. The Lama was originally developed by French manufacturer Sud Avion (later Aérospatiale) for the Indian Air force and especially for the service in a hot and high environment. For almost 30 years it was holding the altitude world record for helicopters.

    Its construction goes back to the Alouette II (3150 series), from which it inherited the characteristic steel-tube frame. Compared to the Alouette II, however, it is equipped with the much stronger Turboméca Astazou IIIB turbine of the Alouette III. The SA 315B Lama has a three-bladed fully articulated main rotor and a three-bladed tail rotor.

    Except for some stabilising braces, the cabin, which is not separated from the cockpit, is completely vitrified. The fuselage frame and the tail boom are steel-tube designs and are not wainscoted. The lack of cladding offers good visibility and accessibility to the actuating elements behind the cockpit.

    The lama is used for passenger transportation, observation, flight training (especially due to its single-engine design, which simplifies the execution of auto rotations) and material transportation. The lama has had a long reputation as being the “pack donkey of the airs”.

    On 21 June 1972, Jean Boulet reached an altitude of 12,442 meters with a lama and, thus, set the absolute record for helicopters. Not until 25 March 2002 was this record broken; by Frédéric North with a Eurocopter AS 350 – he reached an altitude of 12,954 meters.

    In Switzerland, only a few civil users are still flying Lamas, one of which is Air Zermatt. Especially in the harshest conditions in the high mountains these robust machines have proven themselves very successful. Therefore, the characteristic howl of the turbines will still be heard in the Alps for years to come.

  • Eurocopter AS 350 Ecureuil

    1. Before
    2. After
    Technical Data

    The Eurocopter (formerly known as Aérospatiale, today as Airbus Helicopter) AS 350 Ecureuil (Squirrel) is a light single-engine multipurpose helicopter. It was the first model of Aérospatial to be manufactured in mass production. Further, this model also introduced the “Starflex” rotor head, a system that uses only a quarter of the number of moveable parts, which increased maintenance intervals and reduced production efforts.

    History

    The first prototype – still equipped with a Lycoming turbine – had its first lift off on 27 June 1974. The AS 350C series – equipped with the Turboméca Arriel turbine, which was later serialised – took off for the first time on 14 February 1975. More civil and military versions followed.

    On 27 September 1979, the AS 355E Ecureuil 2 (or, for the international market, Twinstar) had its first flight. This model was equipped with two engines, not only for the sake of more efficiency, but also for more safety. The 350 and 355 models were developed parallel. Following the 350L model, for example, was the 355M model. The Ecureuil helicopter family is still in production today and finds customers around the world.

    Records

    On 25 March 2002, Frédéric North reached an altitude of 12,954 meters with an AS 350 model, beating the almost 30 year old altitude record, set by an SA 315 Lama.

    On 14 May 2005, Didier Delsalle succeeded in setting another record with an AS 350 B3+: The first helicopter landing on the peak of the Mount Everest (8,848 m).

  • EC 135 T3

    1. Before
    2. After
    Technical Data

    The rescue helicopter EC 135 T2 was developed in a collective effort by French-German manufacturer Eurocopter. It is a light multipurpose helicopter, actuated by two Turboméca Arrius 2B2 engines.

    EC135The H135 is a powerful, lightweight, twin-engine multi-mission helicopter that showcases top-notch technology while offering low operating costs. The H135’s high endurance and extended range enables this helicopter to perform a full range of mission requirements, while carrying more payload over longer distances than any aircraft in its class. Incorporating a modern cockpit and avionics, as well as, Airbus Helicopters’ Fenestron® tail rotor and bearingless main rotor, the H135 is recognized for its high performance and outstanding maneuverability. It is one of the quietest helicopters in its class. The H135 is approximately 6.5 db below ICAO standards. This is of particular interest to operators regularly flying over cities and in densely-populated areas, including emergency medical services and law enforcement agencies.

    EC135Two FADEC-equipped engine options are available: Turbomeca’s Arrius 2B2 “Plus” and the Pratt & Whitney Canada PW206B3. Both of these powerful, reliable turboshaft engines provide outstanding performance and vital reserves, even in one-engine inoperative scenarios, along with low fuel consumption. The H135’s simple, multi-purpose design, allowing for fast and easy maintenance and optimal dispatch reliability, is enhanced with an unrivaled variety of optional equipment

     

  • Bell 429

    1. Before
    2. After
    Technical Data

    The first take off took place on 27 February 2007, it was approved by the Canadian Aviation Authority on 1 July 2009, and by the EASA according to CS-27 on 23 September 2009, whereas delivery was planned to start at the end of 2009. The Bell 429 is manufactured in Mirabel, Canada.

    In November 2005, already 136 orders had been received (02/2008 over 260), which are planned to be delivered by the second half of 2009. The helicopter costs approximately $5 to $6 million US Dollars a piece. At the beginning of 2013, the Bell 429WLG was introduced, an advancement including retractable landing gear and improved flight efficiency.

  • EC130 T2

    1. Before
    2. After
    Technical Data

    Tourism

    As one of the quietest helicopters in the skies, the H130 sets the standard for tour operations worldwide. Its very low sound level is 7 dB below the ICAO requirement and remains quieter than the most restrictive limits defined for flights over national parks, animal reserves and urban areas.

    The wide, unobstructed cabin can accommodate the pilot and up to seven passengers, providing outstanding visibility through large wrap-around windscreen and wide windows.

    With the open-space cabin, everyone aboard can enjoy spectacular views from their forward-facing seats. Rear passengers are comfortably seated, installed on a raised “theater-style” platform.